THIS is Asthma

NerdHistorically asthma was a “nerd” disorder. Portrayed by kids that could not go outside because they would start wheezing and coughing, maybe even passout. The kids that had inhalers and would take a puff when they were nervous or scared. The kids who stuttered when talking, played Dungeons and Dragons, chess, ate weird foods and dreamed of playing outside.

Having visible difficulty breathing is a way to show one has asthma.  But it is not the only way.  There are many other symptoms that one cannot see.

Think about it for a moment.  Humans who forget to drink enough water suffer from headaches, urinary tract infections, kidney stones and a variety of other ailments.  What would happen if your body was not processing oxygen (and trace gases) efficiently?

head in the cloudsOne thing that happens is the loss of mental faculties.  The brain requires quite of a bit of oxygen to run correctly.  A person who is not getting the proper treatment for their asthma may have trouble thinking clearly acting distracted.

Another is loss of motivation. Why do anything that takes what little energy you might have away from you?  All that matters is … well, nothing.  Nothing takes no energy to maintain. So you get sucked into this vicious circle of nothingness (I experienced a whole year of this.  It is terrible.  I will not go back.)

Why bother making the bed?  Why bother going to work?  Why bother making friends?

whybotherMost of January I was very unmotivated.  I had trouble concentrating, planning, thinking and doing.  It took all my energy to get up, go to work, come home and prepare to repeat.  I did not have energy to create art, do chores or even sleep.  I came home and laid in bed thinking about nothing…  Why bother, I do not have the energy to do anything.

… Wait…. That sounds like Depression!

That is what I thought!

Once  I made the connection (it took forever.  So many bad days…) I started to look for articles relating to a connection between Asthma and Depression.  My handicapped brain had trouble finding many.  Most specialists seem to think that a person is Depressed and has or develops Asthma, which makes the depression worse.  Depression first, Asthma second.

Going along that logic, I am depressed and I developed asthma. I do not think so.

I developed asthma due to a poorly treated bronchial infection and moving to an area with known poor air quality.  Add my existing allergies and POOF, I have asthma.  I am sure I am not the only person that developed asthma later in life.  This was not something I was born with.

On the same note, I have never been diagnosed as depressed.  Yeah, I have bad days like everyone else.  Overall I really like living, and see the sad days as a way to make the good ones better.  I have a mind to dream things and energy to make them happen.  On a consistent basis.  None of the traditional flow and ebb common in people with depression.

Maybe a professional should look into poorly managed Asthma causing Depression.  There are articles on how asthma makes depression worse, how asthma medication can worsen or cause depression, but not much outside of that.  Maybe it is one of those “no kidding” kind of things.  So simple we know it to be true, so no one researches it.

I have gotten additional medication for my asthma.  I hope to see some results in a week or so (it takes a while, sometimes…)  The main fruits of my research are that I CAN do things to keep the depressive side affects at bay.

  1. Take my meds.  On time, every day.
  2. Exercise!  Even 20 minutes of yoga can greatly improve mood.  Most providers recommend 10 minutes of cardio to help strengthen the lungs.
  3. Friends.  Yes, get out and talk to people.  Even if you have to fake feeling great and being upbeat until you are (it works, so say the professionals.)  Ideally should have friends that understand what is going on and can deal with it.
asthmaheros

Asthma Prevention Heros

That is about all I have on this topic today.

I really hope that it helps someone a little bit.

 

 

 

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One thought on “THIS is Asthma

  1. I developed asthma as an adult from long distance running – exercise-induced asthma. Yes, there is irony in that.
    I was recently instructed by my pharmacist on how to properly use my inhalers, which was vastly different from how I had been using them. I used them more often when my breathing was compromised by congestion in my lungs. I do notice a difference in my breathing now that I use the preventative, steroid inhaler daily.
    However, after reading this post I’m going to look into this theory about the connection between asthma and depression. Thanks.

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